Tag Archive | spring birds in calgary

Rare Bird Alert Calgary: April 25

Have you seen an unusual bird in Calgary?  If it is a species on this Reportable_Birds list (PDF), please report it to the  Rare Bird Alert line at 403 221-4519 and leave a message after the beep at the end of the recording.  If you would like some help with species identification, email us at us at zoxox@shaw.ca . To report injured wildlife call the Calgary Wildlife Rehabilitation Society at 403 239-2488, or the Alberta Institute for Wildlife Conservation at 403 946-2361.

This Bird Alert was recorded on Monday April 25, at 9:55 am.

SIGHTINGS FOR

Sunday, April 24
–RED-BREASTED MERGANSER (2) – at Inglewood Bird Sanctuary in SE Calgary by Bill Wilson.
–EURASIAN WIGEON (2) – one at the S side of Glenmore Reservoir in SW Calgary seen by BW and one reported on the Bow River at Mallard Point in SE Fish Creek PP by Jim Davis.
–COMMON LOON – numerous reports of this species in Calgary and area the past 3 days.
–HORNED GREBE – reported by several observers as above.
–RED-NECKED GREBE – numerous reports of this species as above.
–EARED GREBE – reported by several observers as above.
–OSPREY – reported by several observers as above.
–SONG SPARROW – numerous reports of this species as above.

Saturday, April 23
–RED-BREASTED MERGANSER – 5 seen by Bill Wilson on the SW corner of Chestermere Lake and also reported at Inglewood Bird Sanctuary in SE Calgary by Penny Smith and Nature Calgary Field Trip.
–EURASIAN WIGEON (1) – reported in the Frank Lake area, about 8 km E of High River, by Matthew Sim.
–HARLEQUIN DUCK – seen at Inglewood Bird Sanctuary by PS and Nature Calgary Field Trip.
–AMERICAN WHITE PELICAN (18) – in flight over the Bow River near Carburn Park by Sean Phillips.
–THAYER’S GULL (1 first year) – seen at Shepard Landfill in SE Calgary by Terry Korolyk. To reach Shepard Landfill follow McIvor Blvd, located E of 52 St SE, to its end.
–AMERICAN PIPIT – a large flock in the Frank Lake area seen by MS and 2 reported by BW on Twp Rd 232 about 1 km W of Hwy 791 E of Shepard.
–BREWER’S BLACKBIRD (1) – seen in the Frank Lake area by MS.

Friday, April 22
–EURASIAN WIGEON (1) – reported on the Glenmore Reservoir in SW Calgary by BW.
–CINNAMON TEAL (1) – reported in the Calgary area on a trip from High River to Innisfail by Paula & Guy.
–HARLEQUIN DUCK (2 males) – seen at Inglewood Bird Sanctuary in SE Calgary by BW.
–LONG-BILLED CURLEW (2) – seen in the Calgary area on a trip from High River to Innisfail on RR 244 by P & G.
–THAYER’S GULL (1 adult) – at Shepard Landfill by TK.
–EASTERN PHOEBE (1) – heard 200 metres E of Bridge 2 in Shannon Terrace in W Fish Creek in SW Calgary by BW.
–LINCOLN’S SPARROW (1) – reported by Shirley Hartig in her yard just NE of High River.

Thursday, April 21
–EURASIAN WIGEON (3) – reported in the Wimborne Sunny Slopes area SE of Red Deer by Corinne Griffin.

The next scheduled update of the Bird Alert is Thursday, April 28.

Rare Bird Alert Calgary: April 21

Have you seen an unusual bird in Calgary?  If it is a species on this Reportable_Birds list (PDF), please report it to the  Rare Bird Alert line at 403 221-4519 and leave a message after the beep at the end of the recording.  If you would like some help with species identification, email us at us at zoxox@shaw.ca . To report injured wildlife call the Calgary Wildlife Rehabilitation Society at 403 239-2488, or the Alberta Institute for Wildlife Conservation at 403 946-2361.

This Bird Alert was recorded on Thursday April 21, at 10:25 am.

SIGHTINGS FOR

Wednesday, April 20
–CINNAMON TEAL (2) – at Fincastle Lake E of Taber in S Alberta by Lloyd Bennet.
–RED-BREASTED MERGANSER (60) – as above by LB.
–HORNED GREBE (4) – as above by LB.
–THAYER’S GULL (2 birds, 1-1st cycle & 1adult) – seen at the Shepherd Landfill in SE Calgary by Terry Korolyk. To reach Shepard Landfill follow McIvor Blvd, located E of 52 St, E to its end.
–CASPIAN TERN (4) – at Fincastle Lake by LB.
–NASHVILLE WARBLER (1) – reported at Hay Meadow at Mt Lorette just off Hwy 40 in Kananaskis, W of Calgary, by Jim Davis.

Tuesday, April 19
–OSPREY (2) – seen at Carburn Park on the metal tower at Lafarge located S of the pedestrian bridge across the Bow River by Gus Yaki & FFCPP nature field trip.
–AMERICAN ROBIN (1 albinistic) – seen in spruce trees in SW Calgary at the Palace Oak Condominiums complex at Palliser Dr and 24 ST SW.

Monday, April 18
–OSPREY (1) – as above by GY on FFCPP nature trip.
–SANDHILL CRANE (4) – seen just S of Calgary flying Northward by Dwight Knapik.
–WHOOPING CRANE (1) – seen flying in a slight northwesterly direction about 10 miles N and a bit E of Olds by Carl Linnard.
–WILSON’S SNIPE (1) – reported in Banff NP, W of Calgary, by Jason Rogers.
–RED-NAPED SAPSUCKER (1) – as above by JR.
–MARSH WREN (1) – as above by JR.
–SAVANNAH SPARROW (1) – as above by JR.

Saturday, April 16
–CHIPPING SPARROW (1) – reported near the Columbia Icefields on Hwy 93 to Jasper by JR.

Friday, April 15
–AMERICAN DIPPER (5) – at Elbow Falls on Hwy 66 W of Bragg Creek, W of Calgary, by DK.

Wednesday, April 13
–YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLER (1) – in Banff NP by JR.

The next scheduled update of the Bird Alert is Monday, April 25.

Backyard Birds: Common Grackle

The Common Grackle can be a handsome bird when seen from a short distance. Covering its head, neck and upper breast is a purple iridescence that can amaze viewers in the right light. The rest of its feathers, including its long, wedge-shaped tail, are glossed in a bronze-green sheen. But this beauty can be lost on many; a result of the combination of the grackle’s lack of table manners (and all other manners), its voice that sounds like “an un-oiled wheelbarrow” and the invasion of both lawn and feeders by large flocks of  these noisy birds.

Canada’s largest blackbird is both noisy and cocky, and is a resourceful forager. The grackle’s main summer diet consists of insects, small invertebrates and occasionally the eggs and nestlings of other birds. In winter, it will eat waste, grains, seeds, fruit and garbage. They will follow plows to catch invertebrates, pick leeches off the legs of turtles and steal worms from robins, among other techniques to get fast food. The grackle breeds in many different sites but it favours damp, open woodlands, the shores of lakes and streams and wet meadows. Be on the lookout for Grackles as they return to Alberta in April; they are almost here.

The young grackle is even noisier than the adult.

Note the long, wedge-shaped and keeled tail of this grackle.

 

Posted by Matthew Sim

Meet The Mountain Bluebird

The Mountain Bluebird is an early migrant to our area, arriving in mid to late March. There have been a few sightings in the countryside recently, and one was reported in the Tuscany subdivision on March 25. In Calgary, you might see them in Weaselhead, North Glenmore Park, Fish Creek Provincial Park or Nose Hill Park.

Read more about this beautiful bird and report any sightings on the Weaselhead Society website.

See also:

Hinterland Who’s Who

Photo courtesy of fotopedia.com