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Wild Horses – Mothers and Foals

Tony LePrieur photographed these wild horses west of Sundre. He was trying to get a photo of a dam with a foal to give to his mother on Mother’s Day, and he succeeded!

Wild Horses, west of Sundre, May 13, 2017. Photo by Tony LePrieur.

Wild Horses, west of Sundre, May 13, 2017. Photo by Tony LePrieur.

Wild Horses, west of Sundre, May 13, 2017. Photo by Tony LePrieur.

Wild Horses, west of Sundre, May 13, 2017. Photo by Tony LePrieur.

Country Birds

Tony LePrieur went out of town on a rainy day last week and got some photos in the Priddis area and on Grand Valley Road.

Wilson’s Snipe, Priddis area, May 7, 2017. Photo by Tony LePrieur.

Wilson’s Snipe, Priddis area, May 7, 2017. Photo by Tony LePrieur.

Red-winged Blackbird, Priddis area, May 7, 2017. Photo by Tony LePrieur.

The Priddis area, SW of Calgary, is also a great place to find mammals:

Moose, Priddis area, May 7, 2017. Photo by Tony LePrieur.

Moose, Priddis area, May 7, 2017. Photo by Tony LePrieur.

You can find Great Gray Owls near Priddis too, but this one was NW of Calgary:

Great Gray Owl, with Meadow Vole, Grand Valley Road, May 13, 2017. Photo by Tony LePrieur.

And finally, a city bird:

Spotted Sandpiper, Fish Creek Park, May 13, 2017. Photo by Tony LePrieur.

See more of Tony’s photos on his Flickr page.

Furry Friday: Muskrat Love

Tony LePrieur photographed this pair of muskrats mating in Fish Creek Park on May 7.

Muskrat pair mating, Fish Creek Park, May 7, 2017. Photo by Tony LePrieur.

Muskrat (male) post-mating. Yes, that is a muskrat penis. Fish Creek Park, May 7, 2017. Photo by Tony LePrieur.

Muskrat swimming off, Fish Creek Park, May 7, 2017. Photo by Tony LePrieur.

 To see more of Tony’s photos, visit his Flickr page here.

Furry Friday: Hares Changing Colour

Here are three recent photos of Snowshoe Hares taken in the Weaselhead in Calgary, showing the transition from their white winter coat to their brown summer coat.

February 20, 2017: Snowshoe Hare, Weaselhead. Photo by Tony LePrieur.

April 9, 2017: Snowshoe Hare, Weaselhead. Photo by Tony LePrieur.

April 23, 2017: Snowshoe Hare, Weaselhead. Photo by Tony LePrieur.

To see more of Tony LePrieur’s photos, see his Flickr page.

If you have photos of Calgary mammals you’d like to share here, email them to us at birdscalgary@gmail.com.

Furry Friday: Porcupine at Carburn Park

Tony LePrieur photographed this Porcupine in Carburn Park in SE Calgary this week.

Porcupine, Carburn Park, April 20, 2017. Photo by Tony LePrieur.

Porcupine, Carburn Park, April 20, 2017. Photo by Tony LePrieur.

Furry Friday: Deer of Calgary

Posted by Bob Lefebvre

I still find deer identification tricky. Let me know if I’ve misidentified any of these!

Mule Deer Buck, Bebo Grove, Fish Creek Park, November 13, 2016. Photo by Tony LePrieur.

White-tailed Deer Buck, Bebo Grove, Fish Creek Park, November 13, 2016. Photo by Tony LePrieur.

White-tailed Deer, Bebo Grove, Fish Creek Park, November 13, 2016. Photo by Tony LePrieur.

White-tailed Deer Buck, Fish Creek Park, November 14, 2016. Photo by Judi Willis.

White-tailed Deer Buck, Carburn Park, January 31, 2016. Photo by Tony LePrieur.

White-tailed Deer Bucks, Carburn Park, January 31, 2016. Photo by Tony LePrieur.

Mule Deer, Weaselhead, October 18, 2015. Photo by Tony LePrieur.

White-tailed Deer Deer, Weaselhead, October 18, 2015. Photo by Tony LePrieur.

White-tailed Deer with fawns, Carburn Park, August 3, 2015. Photo by Tony LePrieur.

Furry Friday: Snowshoe Hare

Tony LePrieur photographed this Snowshoe Hare in the Weaselhead Nature Area of Calgary on February 20, 2017.

Snowshoe Hare, Weaselhead, February 20,2017. Photo by Tony LePrieur.

Snowshoe Hares (also called Varying Hares) can be found in the city in wooded areas like the river valleys, Fish Creek Park, the Weaselhead, and Griffith Woods Park. They are smaller and have shorter ears and tails than the common White-tailed Jackrabbits you see in residential neighbourhoods and open fields. Jackrabbits have black-tipped ears and a longer white tail. Snowshoe hares have huge hind feet, as their name indicates.

Although they are usually quite common in places like the Weaselhead, they are secretive during the daytime and are rarely seen. You often see their tracks in the snow when birding in these wooded areas. Snowshoe Hares also blend in to their surroundings very well – the white winter coat you see in this photo will soon turn to a rusty brown to help camouflage it during the summer months.

Furry Friday: Coyotes

Photos of Coyotes from Calgary and area, photographed by Tony LePrieur and Judi Willis.

Fish Creek Park, February 12, 2017. Photo by Tony LePrieur.

Queen’s Park Cemetery, January 15, 2017. Photo by Tony LePrieur.

Weaselhead, December 18, 2016. Photo by Tony LePrieur.

Weaselhead, September 25, 2016. Photo by Tony LePrieur.

Fish Creek Park, November 14, 2016. Photo by Judi Willis.

Weaselhead, December 18, 2016. Photo by Tony LePrieur.

Weaselhead, January 31, 2016. Photo by Tony LePrieur.

Weaselhead, November 28, 2015. Photo by Tony LePrieur.

Furry Friday: Moose

Some Moose photographed southwest of Calgary recently by Tony LePrieur.

Moose, near Millarville, January 15, 2017. Photo by Tony LePrieur

Moose, near Millarville, January 15, 2017. Photo by Tony LePrieur

Three Moose, near Turner Valley, January 8, 2017. Photo by Tony LePrieur

The male of the three Moose above, near Turner Valley, January 8, 2017. Photo by Tony LePrieur

For more of Tony’s mammal and bird photogrphs, see his Flickr page.

Birding Locations: Queen’s Park Cemetery

Posted by Bob Lefebvre

Northern Goshawk, Queen’s Park Cemetery, January 28, 2017. All photos by Tony LePrieur, all taken at Queen’s Park Cemetery..

One of the smaller and perhaps underappreciated birding locations in Calgary is Queen’s Park Cemetery, located just northwest of Confederation Park near 4th Street and 40 Avenue NW.

Queen’s Park Cemetery.

The cemetery contains a great number of spruce trees, so it attracts many of the species that prefer to feed in or on those trees, such as the winter finches. Many other species of birds and mammals can also be found there, due to the presence of a creek which stays open year-round. The creek runs along the north end, and is bordered by the thickest growth of trees in the cemetery, both coniferous and deciduous.

Detail, north end of Queen’s Park Cemetery, showing the trees which border the creek.

Within the cemetery parking is limited, and it is best to park outside and walk in, or pull completely off one of the roads to park while allowing other vehicles room to pass. Stay away from funeral processions and ceremonies, of course.

The best birding tends to be where the trees are thickest, though you can find Black-capped Chickadees and Red-Breasted Nuthatches wherever there are trees. Crossbills also tend to move around the park (and into the surrounding neighbourhoods). In some years, Brown Creepers and Golden-crowned Kinglets are very common. A stroll along the roads can usually turn up a few of these in the winter.

Brown Creeper, November 15, 2015.

Golden-crowned Kinglet, November 1, 2015.

Black-capped Chickadee, November 1, 2015.

Pine Siskin, October 25, 2015.

The water that flows through the north end draws many birds to drink, feed, and bathe.

Sharp-shinned Hawk, January 15, 2017.

Sharp-shinned Hawk, January 15, 2017.

Another Sharp-shinned Hawk (or the same one from ten months before?), March 6, 2016.

Sharp-shinned Hawk, March 6, 2016.

Queen’s Park is one of the best places to find crossbills. This year there are few in the city, but White-winged Crossbills have been reported there recently.

White-winged (left) and Red Crossbills, November 15, 2015.

Also November 15, 2015.

Common Redpoll, October 25, 2015.

 Dark-eyed Junco, October 25, 2015.

Black-billed Magpie and Great Horned Owl, October 25, 2015.

This may be the same young Northern Goshawk as in the first photo, taken a week earlier, January 22, 2017.

Queen’s Park Cemetery is home to several mammal species as well. Coyotes den there, and White-tailed Jackrabbits and Eastern Gray Squirrels are common.

White-tailed Jackrabbit, December 18, 2016.

White-tailed Jackrabbit, January 22, 2017.

Coyote, January 15, 2017.

So far, eighty-two bird species have been reported here on eBird. That is a pretty good total for a park that isn’t on the river. Sightings in the past week include Rough-legged Hawk, Golden-crowned Kinglet, Brown Creeper, White-winged Crossbill, and Pine Siskin. Get out and add to the total!